Re-assessing BMI

I remember in High School health class we were told about how BMI works (body mass index) and what range we should be in. I’m 5’4″ tall and have always gone by that number I was given, 120. I have never been and never will be 120. I’m sturdy and there’s no where to take those lbs from. I stumbled upon some revised BMI charts that include a measurement for frame size. For me, this totally changes things, I have a large frame so I am allowed a more reasonable number to aim for. Instead of the unhealthy goal of 120, I fall naturally into the 134-151 range at 147. I feel much better now that I have an attainable and healthy range to shoot for. If you’re like me and felt you could never achieve the BMI you were told you should, you might want to take another look at the charts. Does it change your goal weight?

Body frame size is determined by a person’s wrist circumference in relation to his height. For example, a man whose height is over 5′ 5″ and wrist is 6″ would fall into the small-boned category.

Determining frame size: To determine the body frame size, measure the wrist with a tape measure and use the following chart to determine whether the person is small, medium, or large boned.

Women:

  • Height under 5’2″
    • Small = wrist size less than 5.5″
    • Medium = wrist size 5.5″ to 5.75″
    • Large = wrist size over 5.75″
  • Height 5’2″ to 5′ 5″
    • Small = wrist size less than 6″
    • Medium = wrist size 6″ to 6.25″
    • Large = wrist size over 6.25″
  • Height over 5′ 5″
    • Small = wrist size less than 6.25″
    • Medium = wrist size 6.25″ to 6.5″
    • Large = wrist size over 6.5″

Men:

  • Height over 5′ 5″
    • Small = wrist size 5.5″ to 6.5″
    • Medium = wrist size 6.5″ to 7.5″
    • Large = wrist size over 7.5″

    Height Weight Tables

    Prior to the development of the BMI, weight guidelines relied on data gathered by the life insurance industry.

    They are useful for “at a glance” information, but the figures are not as accurate or predictive as the BMI.

    MEN
    Height
    (in shoes)
    Small Frame Medium Frame Large Frame
    5’2″ 128-134 131-141 138-150
    5’3″ 130-136 133-143 140-153
    5’4″ 132-138 135-145 142-156
    5’5″ 134-140 137-148 144-160
    5’6″ 136-142 139-151 146-164
    5’7″ 138-145 142-154 149-168
    5’8″ 140-148 145-157 152-172
    5’9″ 142-151 148-160 155-176
    5’10” 144-154 151-163 158-180
    5’11” 146-157 154-166 161-184
    6′ 149-160 157-170 164-188
    6’1″ 152-164 160-174 168-192
    6’2″ 155-168 164-178 172-197
    6’3″ 158-172 167-182 176-202
    6’4″ 162-176 171-187 181-207
    WOMEN
    Height
    (in shoes)
    Small Frame Medium Frame Large Frame
    4’10” 102-111 109-121 118-131
    4’11” 103-113 111-123 120-134
    5′ 104-115 113-126 122-137
    5’1″ 106-118 115-129 125-140
    5’2″ 108-121 118-132 128-143
    5’3″ 111-124 121-135 131-147
    5’4″ 114-127 124-138 134-151
    5’5″ 117-130 127-141 137-155
    5’6″ 120-133 130-144 140-159
    5’7″ 123-136 133-147 143-163
    5’8″ 126-139 136-150 146-167
    5’9″ 129-142 139-153 149-170
    5’10” 132-145 142-156 152-173
    5’11” 135-148 145-159 155-176
    6′ 138-151 148-162 158-179

    SOURCE: Build Study, 1979, Society of Actuaries and Associations of Life Insurance Medical Directors of America, Copyright 1983, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.

~ by accordingtoleanne on November 14, 2012.

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